Ms. Clair

Wear something orange on September 30, 2021 to honour and remember Indian Residential School Students

Bonar Law Memorial High School

Introductory Mi’kmaq Language 10

Semester 1, Period 5 

Ms. Katrina Clair, Katrina.clair@nbed.nb.ca

Room 202  

 

Course Description:

Students will complete 5-7 modules of the provincial introductory Mi’kmaq language course.  Some modules include greetings, family members, likes/dislikes, colours (animate and inanimate/singular plural) and weather.  For assessment, students will be expected to speak Mi’kmaq, complete quizzes and create posters or PowerPoints with audio recordings. Written language will be delivered in the Smith-Francis orthography.

Required Materials:

Pencils, commitment to speak Mi’kmaq and language notebook. 

Evaluation:

Speaking and Listening                              50%

Daily Assignments                                           20%

Products                                                               30%

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

BLMS late assignment policy:

-    To get full marks, assignments need to be handed in by the assigned due date.

-    For every date late, after the assignment due date, 10% will be deducted from the mark (up to a maximum of 40%).  Weekends count as one day.

-    If a student is absent on a due date, a written excuse from a parent or guardian must be presented upon the student’s return, or the late-day deductions will apply.

-    A student’s mark cannot be lower than 60% given that the student deserves a passing grade on the assignment to begin with.  Any work getting a mark of less than 60% will receive that grade.

-    In order to be graded, all work must be handed in no later than 1 week after the given due date of the assignment.  Term marks are final.

Bonar Law Memorial High School

Indigenous Studies 120 Course Outline

Semester 1,  Period 4

Ms. Clair: Katrina.clair@nbed.nb.ca

Room 202

 

Course Description:

Indigenous Studies 120 provides students with the opportunity to learn about Wabanaki cultures, history and contributions prior to European contact. Students will also learn about Canada’s shameful legacy of colonization and genocide. Topics covered include, indigenous worldviews, Wabanaki legends, arrival of Europeans, treaties, residential schools and the Indian Act. This course also asks students to take part as leaders in reconciliation.

Materials:

Please be sure to bring a notebook, highlighters, pens, pencils, erasers, a laptop, a growth mindset and life experience!  

Assessment:

Indigenous Perspectives       25%

Wabanaki Societies              35%

Indigenous/Non-Indigenous Relations 20%

Indigenous Advocacy for Social Change 30%

                                    

 

BLMS LATE ASSIGNMENT POLICY: 

 

-    To get full marks, assignments need to be handed in by the assigned due date. 

-    For every date late, after the assignment due date, 10% will be deducted from the mark (up to a maximum of 40%).  Weekends count as one day. 

-    If a student is absent on a due date, a written excuse from a parent or guardian must be presented upon the student’s return, or the late-day deductions will apply. 

-    A student’s mark cannot be lower than 60% given that the student deserves a passing grade on the assignment to begin with.  Any work getting a mark of less than 60% will receive that grade. 

-    In order to be graded, all work must be handed in no later than 2 weeks after the given due date of the assignment. Term marks are final. 

 

 

 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to meet the following curriculum outcomes:

 

GCO 1 Students will apply their knowledge of worldview to understand Indigenous perspectives.

1.1 Students will use the seven elements of worldview to examine their own worldview.

1.2 Students will be able to identify biases.

1.3 Students will summarize the components of oral traditions.

1.4 Students will explore the significance of stories to Indigenous worldviews.

1.5 Students will describe the importance placed on interdependence within the natural world.

GCO 2 Students will investigate the history and culture of Wabanaki societies.

2.1 Students will identify and investigate traditional Wabanaki territories and their governance prior to European colonization.

2.2 Students will demonstrate an understanding of social relationships within Wabanaki societies and the importance of the roles of Elders.

2.3 Students will research aspects of the organization of Mi’kmaq, Wolastoqey, and Peskotomuhkati societies.

2.4 Students will examine the Wabanaki territories and how this has shaped social relationships and identity, and informed resource management and land stewardship.

GCO 3 Students will examine the relationship of Indigenous peoples to non-Indigenous peoples in New Brunswick and in Canada.

3.1 Students will examine the period of initial contact with Europeans.

3.2 Students will apply their understanding of the sacred treaty-making process to the Peace and Friendship Treaties made in agreement with Europeans.

3.3 Students will examine the intent of discriminatory legislation and the role of education to undermine family and social structure, and to destroy Indigenous languages and cultures through the Indian Residential Schools and by other means.

3.4 Students will examine experiences and policies pertaining to Indigenous peoples during periods of global conflict and evaluate impacts.

3.5 Students will analyze current Indigenous and non-Indigenous relations.

GCO 4 Students will recognize the importance of Indigenous advocacy and act as allies for social change.

4.1 Students will investigate significant Indigenous lead movements for social change.

4.2 Students will describe the tools for systemic and societal change including the national inquiry process.

4.3 Students will identify local initiatives that are addressing systemic and social inequities in First Nation realities.

4.4 Students will take action in ways that reflect their learning and context.

Posted: September 3, 2020

Bonar Law Memorial High School

Introductory Mi’kmaw 110

Period 1 8:40-9:40   Period 2 11:00-12:00

Facilitators:

Ms. Mona Francis, Mona.francis@nbed.nb.ca

Ms. Katrina Clair, Katrina.clair@nbed.nb.ca

Room 201  

 

Through modules from the provincial Mi’kmaq language curriculum, students will complete 7 modules of the introductory course. Throughout the course, we will also draw on supplementary Mi’kmaq language learning tools. Students will also be expected to create PowerPoints and use an audio recording program (Audacity). Students will also create an e-portfolio as a pre-requisite for the intermediate course. 

Required Materials:

Pencils, commitment to speak Mi’kmaq, notebook, headset with microphone. Please label all of your personal belongings as there will be no sharing of materials.     

Evaluation:

Oral Skills: 40%

Assignments: 30%

Reflection Journal: 20%

E-Portfolio: 10%

 

BLMS LATE ASSIGNMENT POLICY:

-    To get full marks, assignments need to be handed in by the assigned due date.

-    For every date late, after the assignment due date, 10% will be deducted from the mark (up to a maximum of 40%).  Weekends count as one day.

-    If a student is absent on a due date, a written excuse from a parent or guardian must be presented upon the student’s return, or the late-day deductions will apply.

-    A student’s mark cannot be lower than 60% given that the student deserves a passing grade on the assignment to begin with.  Any work getting a mark of less than 60% will receive that grade.

-    In order to be graded, all work must be handed in no later than 1 week after the given due date of the assignment.  Term marks are final.

Bonar Law Memorial High School

Indigenous Studies 120 Course Outline

    January-June 2020-2021,  Period 2  9:50-10:50

Ms. Clair, Katrina.clair@nbed.nb.ca, 506 523 7160

                         Room 201

 

Course Description:

Indigenous Studies 120 provides students with the opportunity to learn about Wabanaki cultures, history and contributions prior to European contact, as well as to learn about the shameful legacy of colonization and the genocide which ensued. This course also asks students to take part as leaders in reconciliation.

Materials:

Please be sure to bring a notebook, highlighters, pens, pencils, erasers, a laptop & life experience!  Please label all of your personal belongings as there will be no sharing of materials.     

Assessment:

Journal Entries                                                 15%

Daily Assignments                                             25%

Presentations (individual and group)                        30%                                                                                 

Reconciliation/Action Project                                30%                                         Due Jan 25, 2021

 

 

BLMS LATE ASSIGNMENT POLICY: 

 

-    To get full marks, assignments need to be handed in by the assigned due date. 

-    For every date late, after the assignment due date, 10% will be deducted from the mark (up to a maximum of 40%).  Weekends count as one day. 

-    If a student is absent on a due date, a written excuse from a parent or guardian must be presented upon the student’s return, or the late-day deductions will apply. 

-    A student’s mark cannot be lower than 60% given that the student deserves a passing grade on the assignment to begin with.  Any work getting a mark of less than 60% will receive that grade. 

-    In order to be graded, all work must be handed in no later than 2 weeks after the given due date of the assignment. Term marks are final. 

 

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to meet the following curriculum outcomes:

 

GCO 1 Students will apply their knowledge of worldview to understand Indigenous perspectives.

1.1 Students will use the seven elements of worldview to examine their own worldview.

1.2 Students will be able to identify biases.

1.3 Students will summarize the components of oral traditions.

1.4 Students will explore the significance of stories to Indigenous worldviews.

1.5 Students will describe the importance placed on interdependence within the natural world.

GCO 2 Students will investigate the history and culture of Wabanaki societies.

2.1 Students will identify and investigate traditional Wabanaki territories and their governance prior to European colonization.

2.2 Students will demonstrate an understanding of social relationships within Wabanaki societies and the importance of the roles of Elders.

2.3 Students will research aspects of the organization of Mi’kmaq, Wolastoqey, and Peskotomuhkati societies.

2.4 Students will examine the Wabanaki territories and how this has shaped social relationships and identity, and informed resource management and land stewardship.

GCO 3 Students will examine the relationship of Indigenous peoples to non-Indigenous peoples in New Brunswick and in Canada.

3.1 Students will examine the period of initial contact with Europeans.

3.2 Students will apply their understanding of the sacred treaty-making process to the Peace and Friendship Treaties made in agreement with Europeans.

3.3 Students will examine the intent of discriminatory legislation and the role of education to undermine family and social structure, and to destroy Indigenous languages and cultures through the Indian Residential Schools and by other means.

3.4 Students will examine experiences and policies pertaining to Indigenous peoples during periods of global conflict and evaluate impacts.

3.5 Students will analyze current Indigenous and non-Indigenous relations.

GCO 4 Students will recognize the importance of Indigenous advocacy and act as allies for social change.

4.1 Students will investigate significant Indigenous lead movements for social change.

4.2 Students will describe the tools for systemic and societal change including the national inquiry process.

4.3 Students will identify local initiatives that are addressing systemic and social inequities in First Nation realities.

4.4 Students will take action in ways that reflect their learning and context.

 

 

Posted: April 6, 2020

Kwe'! 

Hello, I miss you all and hope you're doing well! As you know, we are moving forward in e-learning for the remainder of the school year. I will be posting weekly activities in our Microsoft teams class.

Please check your email to join our class team. If you have not received an email, please use the code c6tcrc9 to join. 

Once you are logged into our class team, please click on the Indigenous Governance Models tab and from here, click the files tab. From here, you will have access to this week’s PowerPoint along with a list of guided reading questions.

I look forward to seeing you online and will be available through email and our class team site.  

Take care and be safe,

Ms. Clair

 

Kwe'!

Miss you all and hope you are doing well. Here is the link to the New Brunswick Virtual Learning website where you can access the remainder of modules for this course. Many of you are on module 2 & 3, please continue where you left off. Drop boxes for assignments have been closed but this is still an important tool for strengthening your Mi'kmaq language vocabulary. If you would like to continue onto the intermediate Mi'kmaq Language during the next school year, you will need this course as a prerequisite.   

https://nbvhs.nbed.nb.ca/

Also, I’ve created a Microsoft Teams page for this class, please check your email for an invitation. If you have not received an email, you can join the class team with this code: wgrtxjs

Again, I hope you all are doing well and I look forward to hearing from you all.

Be safe and stay healthy,

Ms.Clair

Posted: September 19, 2019

             

             Bonar Law Memorial High School

           Indigenous Studies 120 Course Outline

                September – January, M-F 4th Period (12:50-1:50)

               Ms. Clair, Katrina.clair@nbed.nb.ca, 506 521 7160

Room 201

 

Course Description:

Indigenous Studies 120 provides students with the opportunity to learn about Wabanaki cultures, history and contributions prior to European contact, as well as to learn about the shameful legacy of colonization and the genocide which ensued. This course also seeks to explore contemporary expressions of Indigeneity.

Materials:

Journals, binders, highlighters, pens, dictionaries, pencils.

Assessment:

Reflective Journals, Note Taking and Active Listening ---- 20%

Class Presentations/ Research Projects (group)--- 20%

Learning portfolios with Self-Assessment or Interview---25%

Agents of Social Change/Reconciliation/Action Project -----35%

 

«  If assessments are missed due to absence, students will be expected to make up for them at a later date.   

 

Students will be assessed on their ability to meet the following curriculum outcomes: 

GCO 1 Students will apply their knowledge of worldview to understand Indigenous perspectives.

1.1 Students will use the seven elements of worldview to examine their own worldview.

1.2 Students will be able to identify biases.

1.3 Students will summarize the components of oral traditions.

1.4 Students will explore the significance of stories to Indigenous worldviews.

1.5 Students will describe the importance placed on interdependence within the natural world.

GCO 2 Students will investigate the history and culture of Wabanaki societies.

2.1 Students will identify and investigate traditional Wabanaki territories and their governance prior to European colonization.

2.2 Students will demonstrate an understanding of social relationships within Wabanaki societies and the importance of the roles of Elders.

2.3 Students will research aspects of the organization of Mi’kmaq, Wolastoqey, and Peskotomuhkati societies.

2.4 Students will examine the Wabanaki territories and how this has shaped social relationships and identity, and informed resource management and land stewardship.

GCO 3 Students will examine the relationship of Indigenous peoples to non-Indigenous peoples in New Brunswick and in Canada.

3.1 Students will examine the period of initial contact with Europeans.

3.2 Students will apply their understanding of the sacred treaty-making process to the Peace and Friendship Treaties made in agreement with Europeans.

3.3 Students will examine the intent of discriminatory legislation and the role of education to undermine family and social structure, and to destroy Indigenous languages and cultures through the Indian Residential Schools and by other means.

3.4 Students will examine experiences and policies pertaining to Indigenous peoples during periods of global conflict and evaluate impacts.

3.5 Students will analyze current Indigenous and non-Indigenous relations.

GCO 4Students will recognize the importance of Indigenous advocacy and act as allies for social change.

4.1 Students will investigate significant Indigenous lead movements for social change.

4.2 Students will describe the tools for systemic and societal change including the national inquiry process.

4.3 Students will identify local initiatives that are addressing systemic and social inequities in First Nation realities.

4.4 Students will take action in ways that reflect their learning and context.

 

 

Posted: September 4, 2019

NBVLC Introductory Mi'kmaw Language

Pages

Documents

Semester 1 Period 5 Mi'kmaq Language Course Outline
Semester 1 Period 4 Indigenous Studies Course Outline